paulftompkins

paulftompkins:

This was quite a journey! I spent the better part of a day going back and forth with a guy that I was not entirely sure was for real at first, then I absolutely got fooled, and then I realized I got fooled. It was fun. The guy said some LEGITIMATELY funny stuff when he was “in character.” And it all ended in a way that I felt good about.

It’s pretty much all laid out in the screencaps, But let me elaborate here:

HEY YOUNG MEN! I know it seems like women complain a lot about how they are represented in media, including fiction, and how it seems like they want entertainment tailored specifically to them, and how they seem to want ALL of pop culture to be politically correct or feminist-ized or whatever it is you think they want, but really, what’s happening is that women are tired of seeing garbage women characters in most of our entertainment. And they’re wondering, Would it really be so much trouble to make more realized female characters? You could still have all your CGI and action and science fiction and drama and swords and stuff, but the female characters could be a little more fleshed out and interesting. And the entertainment would still be good and would, in fact, be better.

Guys, instead of  thinking, “Hey, not everything has to be politicized,” try thinking, “I wonder what it would be like for me if the situation were reversed, and how I’d feel if in the vast majority of the entertainment I consumed, the male characters were few and far between and then mostly used as talking props & plot devices. I wonder if I’d get kinda tired of that and occasionally I’d say something, even a little joke, just to ease the annoyance a little.”

Fellows. Listen to the women in your lives. Ask them questions. It will change your perspective for the better. Years ago, I got into a brief argument with two female friends of mine about a movie— it does not even matter which movie— that they viewed as sexist and I did not. I couldn;t even fathom how they could see it that way. I tried to argue that it was not sexist. In recounting our discussion to another party, it was pointed out to me that they might have a different viewpoint based on their life experiences, and that it was not for me to tell them that their interpretation was incorrect. And that I was probably getting defensive about it because if the movie was sexist, it followed that my liking it would make me appear sexist. And that’s when I realized that none of this was about me, and maybe I should shut up and listen and try to understand. And also to be more aware of things like this and develop not just my sympathy, but my empathy.

I will only ever be able to empathize so much with women, because my experience as a white male in America is vastly different from that of anyone who is not that. But I can relate to:

  • not being taken seriously
  • not being listened to
  • being dismissed
  • being condescended to
  • having something explained to me that I already understand

And I having had those experiences, I am now more inclined to TRY to understand where someone is coming from if they are telling me they are having a similar experience with our culture.

So guys: just try. You don’t even really have to dig that deep. Think about your own experiences as a person, then apply that to someone else. It gets easier the more you do it, and it makes your life better.

Anyway, I hear Dawn of The Planet of The Apes is pretty good! 

First of all, no Paul, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes isn’t pretty good.

Second of all, even of this Grady guy was “joking around” which I don’t, believe, he still comes across as a douchebag.

However, you are right, As men, we need to TRY better not just in the entertainment industry where it seems as if being a woman with a great storyline and is allowed to be a three dimensional human is so underrepresented it may as well be a minority, but also as a sex.

Maybe if we could just listen to these problems, we’d understand what is going on, and we’d be all the better for it.

kingofooo
kingofooo:

Something Big promo by writer/storyboard artist Jesse Moynihan
premieres Thursday, July 3rd at 7/6c.
from Jesse:

If you don’t know, here’s the story of how “Something Big” came about:
Mid Season 5 we tried to make a 45 minute Adventure Time TV movie. We almost did it, but the thing was a mess and needed so much work to get in shape. All the individual parts were really cool, but they weren’t hanging together right, and the end seemed impossible to figure out. I’d boarded the first 10 minutes of it (Steve Wolfhard helped me clean up my drawings. Actually Steve cleaned up all of my drawings.)
So the thing sat there for months. I was really psyched on my section and started to feel certain this movie was never gonna see the light of day. So we started pushing that we should cannibalize the parts and make them into episodes. That’s basically what happened. I got my opening section and used about half of it of it to make this episode a standalone story.
It’s the first episode I boarded by myself, which was a cool experience after several years of collaborating with partners. Collaborating is something a lot of indie comic artists aren’t used to doing. It creates this exciting/frightening sense of risk and surprise. Most of the time it’s humbling because your partner will come up with story solutions and visual set pieces you’d never think of. BUT it’s also awesome to have complete control over the pacing and layout of a story. You get the freedom to reach unhindered into your vision of the episode architecture.
It’s not something I’d want to do every time, but it was a nice change of pace.
I don’t know why I put a gradient on this drawing. I was just messing around I guess.


Now I want an Adventure Time movie

kingofooo:

Something Big promo by writer/storyboard artist Jesse Moynihan

premieres Thursday, July 3rd at 7/6c.

from Jesse:


If you don’t know, here’s the story of how “Something Big” came about:

Mid Season 5 we tried to make a 45 minute Adventure Time TV movie. We almost did it, but the thing was a mess and needed so much work to get in shape. All the individual parts were really cool, but they weren’t hanging together right, and the end seemed impossible to figure out. I’d boarded the first 10 minutes of it (Steve Wolfhard helped me clean up my drawings. Actually Steve cleaned up all of my drawings.)

So the thing sat there for months. I was really psyched on my section and started to feel certain this movie was never gonna see the light of day. So we started pushing that we should cannibalize the parts and make them into episodes. That’s basically what happened. I got my opening section and used about half of it of it to make this episode a standalone story.

It’s the first episode I boarded by myself, which was a cool experience after several years of collaborating with partners. Collaborating is something a lot of indie comic artists aren’t used to doing. It creates this exciting/frightening sense of risk and surprise. Most of the time it’s humbling because your partner will come up with story solutions and visual set pieces you’d never think of. BUT it’s also awesome to have complete control over the pacing and layout of a story. You get the freedom to reach unhindered into your vision of the episode architecture.

It’s not something I’d want to do every time, but it was a nice change of pace.

I don’t know why I put a gradient on this drawing. I was just messing around I guess.

Now I want an Adventure Time movie

zayphora-deactivated20140709

zenstiel-the-chill-angel:

boneycircus:

fauxcyclops:

morelikekanyebest:

only-ronnie:

i will never not reblog this

Dr. Seuss was a racist. He wouldn’t attach his words to an interracial romance. Here are seven racist cartoons he made about Japanese-Americans during WWII.

He also later apologized and wrote Horton Hears a Who! to illustrate his remorse for his previous way of thinking

HALLEJ FUCKING ULAH